Cast Iron (general info) > Cleaning and Restoration

Conversion Chart for Washing Soda - Electro

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Roger Barfield:
So Jeff, you're saying a cup is a cup.  Thanks for clearing that up.  ;) ;D

Cheryl Watson:
I worry about too much Washing soda only if my charger clamps are too HOT to the touch... :)

Jeff Friend:
Yes, Roger, that is what I am saying.  I thought Cheryl's statement "dry measure is different than liquid measure" might be confusing, so I went to the link she posted and it was confusing, too.  In my line of work, and especially in your line of work, confusion about measurements is not good.  A dry cup is the same as any other cup.

Now about those hot charger clamps.  If they are hot, your connection isn't good enough.  Heat comes from power dissipation which is a result of electrical resistance at the connection.  Make sure there is no corrosion on the clamp and what you are clamping onto.  Both clamps must be tightly connected to the anode and cathode.  My thought is that warm is OK, but anything more than warm is not OK.  If you're trying to push 50+ amps through a skillet (and I do not think more than 20 amps is ever called for) you probably should not rely on the clamp to carry that much current for hours on end.  You really need some bolted connections instead of clamps.  Remember, the power that is lost to heating a poor connections is power that is not available to clean your utensil.

Cheryl Watson:
Jeff, I run at 20 amps, no higher.  And with connections functioning perfectly well, I have observed that adding washing soda can, and has, caused my electro to run "hotter" than before the extra washing soda was added.   Others have reported this same phenomena, hence my cautions regarding too much washing soda in the electro. 

I have also observed that I need to ADD washing soda when the temperatures drop as they have currently done, to enhance conduction and cleaning.  Once again, learn by doing and personal observation.  :)



Roger Barfield:

--- Quote ---Yes, Roger, that is what I am saying.  I thought Cheryl's statement "dry measure is different than liquid measure" might be confusing, so I went to the link she posted and it was confusing, too.  In my line of work, and especially in your line of work, confusion about measurements is not good.  A dry cup is the same as any other cup.
--- End quote ---


Yes measurements are extremely critical in my line of work. I don't think they require that level of accuracy for setting up an electrolysis rig.  I didn't find the statement or the article to be confusing.  I never measured anything to set up my rig.  I simply hung a skillet in it and turned it on with no sodium carbonate.  Then added it slowly and watched the amps until it got to 20.  I've been using it for years without any issues.  Anything more than 20 amps and you are just heating up the water and wearing out your battery charger before it's time.   

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