Author Topic: Bees wax / buzzy wax  (Read 882 times)

Offline Joseph Durham

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Bees wax / buzzy wax
« on: February 06, 2020, 08:53:31 PM »
Iím curious, I keep seeing sites offering a beeswax product for the seasoning of their cast iron; using it on every piece they use and collect. Has anyone here tried these products?  Thoughts?  Results?

Offline Cheryl Watson

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2020, 09:33:47 PM »
I have not seen the need to line other's pocket's with $$$ in their attempts to "reinvent" the "wheel" !   ;) ;)  ;D

My seasoned users are seasoned with Crisco or Grapeseed oil
(I do high heat seasoning at 500į)

The many, many others that I will likely never , ever use, are restored and then preserved using Mineral Oil. :)

I can always season them for cooking later... if I feel I must use a high $$$ piece to cook with.  8-) 8-)

Offline Joseph Durham

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2020, 09:54:19 PM »
Quote
I have not seen the need to line other's pocket's with $$$ in their attempts to "reinvent" the "wheel" !† †;) ;)† ;D

My seasoned users are seasoned with Crisco or Grapeseed oil
(I do high heat seasoning at 500į)

The many, many others that I will likely never , ever use, are restored and then preserved using Mineral Oil. :)

I can always season them for cooking later... if I feel I must use a high $$$ piece to cook with.† 8-) 8-)
Good point.
Anyone else?

Offline Russell Ware

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2020, 08:32:10 AM »
Beeswax is a solid, so how is it put into to a form that spreads easily on cast iron, and why would you take time to do that when you can very easily apply oil from a can  of cooking spray?
I've heard of people using bear fat to season cast iron. Why go out of your way when you can keep it simple - and cheap?

Offline Valerie Johnson

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2020, 10:01:30 AM »
While I would not use Bee's wax the fact that is a solid does not bother me, I use coconut oil which comes in a paste form and melts at very low temps, so when I preheat the pan prior to wiping on the seasoning the coconut pastes melts as soon as it hits the pan
Beeswax however in my opinion would leave a sticky residue on the iron as opposed to a hardened non stick surface

Offline Colin Campbell

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2020, 01:26:00 PM »
I have a friend who uses it for long term storage rather than letting oil go rancid.

Offline Cheryl Watson

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2020, 03:31:35 PM »
Quote
I have a friend who uses it for long term storage rather than letting oil go rancid.

[size=14]The Buzzywax formula contains a blend of Grapeseed & Canola oils, so IMO, this will still allow the seasoning to 'turn rancid' when a piece is not 'used'..

This is why I made the decision to use Food Grade Mineral Oil on pieces in my Collection that are not going to be used.

I finally listened to some of the 'old timers' here† ;) and wish I had listened sooner,,,,,

As I now have about two or three years + worth of pieces that have, in fact , developed rancidity, (become a bit smelly and are no longer 'black', a muddy brown color now) and really should be re-stripped!† Ugh!!!

So my routine is Mineral Oil for all, and if I decide I need to use it, then a restrip and actual seasoning will occur.† I certainly am fully equipped to handle it![/size]
« Last Edit: February 07, 2020, 03:32:58 PM by lillyc »

Offline Dwayne Henson

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2020, 01:10:50 AM »
I've had great results using Crisco, I like Cheryl use high heat while seasoning. I have pieces that I seasoned 15 years ago with Crisco, have never used and have never had one get rancid smelling. Your climate may vary. Crisco works for me, is cheap, so I stick with what I know.†
« Last Edit: February 11, 2020, 01:11:32 AM by ddaa99 »
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Offline Paul Beer

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2020, 09:20:18 AM »
crisco is the best for all the reasons Dwayne says. I've been using it for years also and it does a great job and lasts without problems.

Offline Joseph Durham

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2020, 09:42:30 AM »
Thanks everyone for you comments. I use to use vegetable oil, but I have switched over to crisco about a month ago. I know Iím glad I did.

Online Duke Gilleland

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2020, 05:27:17 PM »
Quote
crisco is the best for all the reasons Dwayne says. I've been using it for years also and it does a great job and lasts without problems.
Ditto...Gets my vote and have been with it over 15 years [smiley=thumbsup.gif]
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Offline Sandy Glenn

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2020, 01:54:01 AM »
I'm in the solid Crisco crowd, too... I swear by it.
« Last Edit: February 14, 2020, 01:55:05 AM by Sandy_Glenn »
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Offline Greg Stahl

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #12 on: February 15, 2020, 10:50:29 PM »
Crisco and/or mineral oil for me. If I have a piece that is lightly pitted, I'll use PAM, as it seems to fill in the small pits very easily too.
"NO MORE MISTER NICE GUY!!" Alice Cooper.

Offline Howard Bevan

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #13 on: February 23, 2020, 11:14:51 AM »
I'm on the other side of some of this. I've used Crisco and oil for quite awhile and was happy with it. My DO was well seasoned but after cooking it would get quite ugly. Using Buzzy it stays outstandingly black and shiny and IMO is highly superior to Crisco or oil. When seasoning, this product calls for 500 degrees and leaves a non sticky shiny black hard finish. Yes it may turn rancid but I use my pans and only one had gotten a bit smelly. I simply washed it well and reapplied the Buzzy in a very light film and was good to go. I was a bit hesitant about it too but I think you should at least try something before bashing it. Heck you might even like it. :)  You fellows know more about cast than I ever will but I do like this product. Thanks for listening.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2020, 11:22:27 AM by coalman »

Offline Dwayne Henson

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #14 on: February 24, 2020, 11:12:05 AM »
Not bashing, just don't see any reason to change what works and is cheap to boot.
But, if I was going to change it'd be to Pam. What Greg said is true, it will actually cover some minor pitting.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2020, 11:17:07 AM by ddaa99 »
Experience hath shewn, that even under the best forms of government those entrusted with power have, in time, and by slow operations, perverted it into tyranny.
Thomas Jefferson

Offline Russell Ware

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #15 on: February 24, 2020, 11:30:27 AM »
The best seasoning agent is the one that works best for your style of cooking. That is the key point to keep in mind, and the fact that I always stress with people.

Offline Herman Gagne

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #16 on: February 24, 2020, 03:14:24 PM »
All of my cast not in use, has been seasoned with Pam; I do 2 operations the same way: spray Pam, wipe it off with paper towel 3 times, and in the oven at 500 degrees; repeat a second time, and I'm done.
With about 450 pieces done that way, and stored in my tool shed for 10 years, now in my basement, I've never had a rancid smelling piece; they have a "semi" gloss to them, and perfectly dry to the touch.
So Pam works for me...

Offline Howard Bevan

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #17 on: February 24, 2020, 05:18:41 PM »
Bashing was a bad word. Sorry. I used Pam for years and for me it never added a seasoning layer. It looked great when I sprayed it and hung it up but after cooking, cleaning, and drying there wasn't any buildup. The Buzzy seems to keep building and stays shiny black.  I only cook with my iron but if I were to store it I would use the Pam to stay away from the rancidness. Pam works on my snow blower too and gets coated with it for the summer but that's another story.

Offline Cheryl Watson

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #18 on: February 24, 2020, 05:32:50 PM »
I guess I should add a bit to my post above.......

When I started out learning the ropes of seasoning CI , I used mainly PAM.

I then also experimented with Spray On Grapeseed Oil.

It is the PAM seasoned pieces (most of them unused) that have turned color and developed a slight smell which I view as rancidity.

I have since gone to Solid Crisco shortening, although Grapeseed aerosol is not completely out of the mix.... (I just have to pick up a fresh can. :) )






Offline Colin Campbell

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Re: Bees wax / buzzy wax
« Reply #19 on: February 28, 2020, 09:16:40 PM »
Quote
Quote
I have a friend who uses it for long term storage rather than letting oil go rancid.

[size=14]The Buzzywax formula contains a blend of Grapeseed & Canola oils, so IMO, this will still allow the seasoning to 'turn rancid' when a piece is not 'used'..

This is why I made the decision to use Food Grade Mineral Oil on pieces in my Collection that are not going to be used.

I finally listened to some of the 'old timers' here† ;) and wish I had listened sooner,,,,,

As I now have about two or three years + worth of pieces that have, in fact , developed rancidity, (become a bit smelly and are no longer 'black', a muddy brown color now) and really should be re-stripped!† Ugh!!!

So my routine is Mineral Oil for all, and if I decide I need to use it, then a restrip and actual seasoning will occur.† I certainly am fully equipped to handle it![/size]

Sorry for getting back to this one late.  My friend uses a 100% food grade beeswax.  No oils mixed in.  Whether this is just a coating for storage, or actually polymerized/seasoned, I don't know.