Author Topic: Identifying funk on outside of skillet  (Read 285 times)

Offline Christian Andersen

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Identifying funk on outside of skillet
« on: December 17, 2019, 09:35:38 PM »
So I picked up a very rough looking skillet recently.  Iíve identified it as a Lodge SK 10, post 1960.  3 notch heat ring, etc.  Iím not a Lodge fan, but this one was old enough to have a smooth cooking surface, not the current rough style surface, and itís big and heavy.
I only purchased this one because I have been honing my technique with the Lye bath, vinegar soak, etc. 

This pan though has the worst sort of baked on and very cracked looking stuff adhered to the outer sidewall.
The lye bath took of the usual grease/oil, but it did NOTHING to this cracked skin that remains.
To me this looked almost like what a piece would look like if it was thrown in a fire, and somehow the years of seasoning had burned forged/burnt seasoning into the pan itself.

Anyway, I will attempt to load these pics here.  1st time for loading pics.    Just wondered what you make of this lizard texture that is on here.

Offline Valerie Johnson

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Re: Identifying funk on outside of skillet
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2019, 11:36:20 PM »
More time in the lye bath, You can also use electrolysis to loosen some of it up

Offline Russell Ware

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Re: Identifying funk on outside of skillet
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2019, 09:11:46 AM »
It's just burnt on, carbonized lard.
Alternating between lye and electrolysis usually takes it right off.
If your lye bath isn't working, I'd have to start by asking what volumes of lye and water did you mix together, and what type of lye source did you use?
I had some troublesome pieces lately, so I changed the lye, and it all came right off.

Offline Christian Andersen

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Re: Identifying funk on outside of skillet
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2019, 10:52:55 AM »
Quote
It's just burnt on, carbonized lard.
Alternating between lye and electrolysis usually takes it right off.
If your lye bath isn't working, I'd have to start by asking what volumes of lye and water did you mix together, and what type of lye source did you use?
I had some troublesome pieces lately, so I changed the lye, and it all came right off.

I purchased the Lye via ĎBulk Apothecaryí website which is referred to on here.   Sodium Hydroxode Lye, 8lbs purchased.
My mix ratio was set to be 1 lb Lye to 5 gal water.   Due to the depth of lye tank I needed to go with about 6.5 gal water, and therefor I raised the lye amount to about 1.5 lbs.

I also had 4-5 other items in same bath, so I will run a new bath with fresh ingredients, and just the single piece. 
This weekend I will get the electrolysis tank set up.  Have not done that before.

Offline Russell Ware

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Re: Identifying funk on outside of skillet
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2019, 01:02:00 PM »
I've been using 2lbs lye with 5gal water. It gives good results. The recommendation here is to use a 5% lye solution. That's a little more than 2lbs in 5gal water, but the local home improvement store sells 2lb bottles of it, so that's what I use.
Some people here are even known to mix up double strength lye (4lbs in 5gal water).