Author Topic: Keeping the sacrificial anode cleaned  (Read 1324 times)

Offline Valerie Johnson

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Keeping the sacrificial anode cleaned
« on: October 25, 2019, 08:19:14 PM »
I try to keep my sacrificial anode as clean as possible but the rust seems to embed itself into the stainless and can be difficult to clean, I have been experimenting with different methods of cleaning the piece of stainless and have been cleaning it with a 5% solution of Muriatic acid and water, I place the anode in a tank with the solution and the anode cleans up very nicely after which I rinse, wash with soapy water and rinse again. This seems to work out well with little elbow grease needed.

Anyone else have any methods of cleaning their anode.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2019, 08:20:02 PM by sewingstuff01 »

Offline Russell Ware

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Re: Keeping the sacrificial anode cleaned
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2019, 09:40:53 AM »
Have you tried using a scrap pan or other piece of iron? Hang the scrap piece in your tank like you are going to clean it, but swap the wires so it becomes the sacrificial piece. That's the easiest way to clean your stainless part.
Do you know what grade of stainless steel you are using?

Offline Valerie Johnson

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Re: Keeping the sacrificial anode cleaned
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2019, 11:37:41 AM »
My piece of stainless was a piece of 3/16"  sheeting that was scrap, it is kind of an odd shape and I don't know what grade it it, I do know that rust bonds to it like a paint and when I dip it in the Muriatic acid solution for a little while it comes out clean as a whistle. I always have Muriatic acid on hand for my pool so I tried it and it works great