Author Topic: What could be causing this?  (Read 518 times)

Offline Chip Packard

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What could be causing this?
« on: March 05, 2019, 11:45:15 AM »
Thanks for the add, this is my first post.

I did a batch of re-seasoning a couple of weeks ago, and was pleased with most of the results, but had one Wagner pan that turned out weird. I cleaned all of the 4 pans (3 Wagners and a polished Lodge) using the self cleaning oven method. Then scrubbed clean and oven dried six coats of Flax oil at 500° with cool downs and warm ups in between. Below are pictures before and after. As you can see the seasoning turned out great on the polished lodge, and two of the Wagners. But the third #8 has a bad section that just wouldn't hold seasoning well.  Any Ideas?

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Offline Chip Packard

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Re: What could be causing this?
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2019, 12:02:34 PM »
Here is what they looked like before and after the self cleaning oven cycle, and then after the scrub and dry. You can see the one #8 already had the discoloration before any seasoning.
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Offline Herman Gagne

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Re: What could be causing this?
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2019, 02:55:54 PM »
Looking at the last picture, just above, you can clearly see the outline of the bad section, by enlarging the picture; it looks like the pan was left with water in it, with the handle tilted up. It would have taken some time to get that way, possibly with impurities in the water, attacking the metal.
You may be able to get an even color, but I'm afraid the deep pitting is permanent; a good user though...

Offline Chip Packard

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Re: What could be causing this?
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2019, 04:40:12 PM »
Quote
Looking at the last picture, just above, you can clearly see the outline of the bad section, by enlarging the picture; it looks like the pan was left with water in it, with the handle tilted up. It would have taken some time to get that way, possibly with impurities in the water, attacking the metal.
You may be able to get an even color, but I'm afraid the deep pitting is permanent; a good user though...

That is exactly what happened. A freind of mine's new boyfreind was trying to be good, and did the dishes, but he had no experience with cast iron, and left it in the sink filled with water. It stripped the original seasoning, and she had no luck re-seasoning using the stove top. I volunteered to give it a try when I redid mine.

Her previous boyfriend polished that modern lodge for her, but she could never get it seasoned right. The method I used did a great job on it. Do you think sanding and polishing the damaged Wagner #8 could remove the majority of the problem?
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Offline Russell Ware

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Re: What could be causing this?
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2019, 05:26:44 PM »
The problem with polishing current era Lodge is exactly what you, or your friend, are experiencing - seasoning won’t stick. Depending on what was used to do the polishing, some of that material could very well be imbedded in the cooking surface. That will certainly inhibit proper seasoning. It doesn’t sound too appetizing either. Chuck that skillet in the recycling, or make a clock or wind chime out of it. It shouldn’t be used for cooking. Why do you, or your friend, have an issue with the naturally bumpy and unground current era Lodge surface? I have never had any issues with food sticking in any of mine. Regardless to what current urban myths portend, unground skillets pose no issues for cooking. As a matter of fact, Lodge and BSR offered unground skillets in all of their catalogs back through time. They were cheaper to make and sell that way.
Sanding and polishing the damaged Wagner #8 is a bad idea that will only complicate matters. Use a different skillet for stove top cooking, and use the Wagner for baking food in the oven. If you start grinding one part of the skillet, it will only make that part thinner, increasing chances of warping or uneven heating/cooking.
Keep in mind that two coats of pre-seasoning is all that is necessary to prep a pan for use. Six coats starts to get too thick. Don’t be surprised if the flax seed oil starts to flake or crack. Most people here will recommend you change seasoning oils. Canola, Crisco, or coconut oil work much better in my experiences.

Offline Greg Stahl

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Re: What could be causing this?
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2019, 10:41:20 PM »
Stay away from Flax seed oil.  It will flake off in no time.  I would do electrolysis on these pieces and then season and see what you get.  The pitted piece is not able to be sanded that will make it look correct.  It is still a a great user piece, just not collectible and #8's in any foundry were made by the boat loads (exception, Griswold spider).
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Offline Chip Packard

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Re: What could be causing this?
« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2019, 10:50:51 AM »
Quote
The problem with polishing current era Lodge is exactly what you, or your friend, are experiencing - seasoning won’t stick. Depending on what was used to do the polishing, some of that material could very well be imbedded in the cooking surface. That will certainly inhibit proper seasoning. It doesn’t sound too appetizing either. Chuck that skillet in the recycling, or make a clock or wind chime out of it. It shouldn’t be used for cooking. Why do you, or your friend, have an issue with the naturally bumpy and unground current era Lodge surface? I have never had any issues with food sticking in any of mine. Regardless to what current urban myths portend, unground skillets pose no issues for cooking. As a matter of fact, Lodge and BSR offered unground skillets in all of their catalogs back through time. They were cheaper to make and sell that way.
Sanding and polishing the damaged Wagner #8 is a bad idea that will only complicate matters. Use a different skillet for stove top cooking, and use the Wagner for baking food in the oven. If you start grinding one part of the skillet, it will only make that part thinner, increasing chances of warping or uneven heating/cooking.
Keep in mind that two coats of pre-seasoning is all that is necessary to prep a pan for use. Six coats starts to get too thick. Don’t be surprised if the flax seed oil starts to flake or crack. Most people here will recommend you change seasoning oils. Canola, Crisco, or coconut oil work much better in my experiences.


Quote
Stay away from Flax seed oil.  It will flake off in no time.  I would do electrolysis on these pieces and then season and see what you get.  The pitted piece is not able to be sanded that will make it look correct.  It is still a a great user piece, just not collectible and #8's in any foundry were made by the boat loads (exception, Griswold spider).

I have been cooking in one of the Wagners now for several weeks since he seasoning session, it is amazing, and I have not had any issues with the Flax flaking off.

As you can see form the pic, the polished lodge seasoned very well with the oven flax method. My friend has had no issues with it.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2019, 10:52:18 AM by pateco »
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Offline Cheryl Watson

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Re: What could be causing this?
« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2019, 03:09:54 PM »
Chip, the problem that many of us here have observed:

Flaxseed oil initially looks great, and seems to perform well.

Then........

Depending on how frequently a piece is used.......

Could be 6 months, could be 10 months........

Suddenly the Flax seasoning begins to lift, and sheds black pieces of carbonized seasoning into the food being cooked.   It isn't pretty, visually or to the taste buds.

At that point, the only option is to strip the piece and start over.

(and stripping Flax oil is definitely not easy, and no fun!   :) )

This is the reason why many of us do not recommend using it....