Author Topic: Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!  (Read 6692 times)

Offline Cheryl Watson

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Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!
« on: October 17, 2016, 09:45:40 PM »
One down and one to go...... Someone just shoot me if I ever buy any more of these... pleeez!!!

So about 2 years ago I picked up a smaller No.25, 4 quart, Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit and Lard Press (nice piece, still broken down and awaiting restoration, but complete with all pieces.)

Last November an acquaintance contacted me with a request.  He had picked up an 8 Quart Enterprise Sausage stuffer, which he wanted to use to make Italian Sausage, etc.  Could I restore it??  Well the weather turned early last year... and I finally got to it... in spite of life....

So here is the 8 quart monster that weighs 'a lot' !! ;D
(And NO... it is not painted... but should finally be safe to use...  8-))  All clean and pretty, and well oiled with Food Grade Mineral Oil........ First the 'before' pictures....
« Last Edit: October 17, 2016, 11:06:40 PM by lillyc »

Offline Cheryl Watson

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Re: Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2016, 09:46:51 PM »
After... and the bottom was a real bugger... flash rusting all to heck.. so hopefully it will start darkening down in the next few days.... :)
« Last Edit: October 17, 2016, 09:47:43 PM by lillyc »

Offline Jim Glatthaar

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Re: Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2016, 11:23:24 PM »
Ugh, maybe but you did a beautiful restoration on it. 8-)

Offline C. Perry Rapier

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Re: Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!
« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2016, 12:48:21 AM »
Quote
Ugh, maybe but you did a beautiful restoration on it. 8-)

I agree Jim. She sure did do a beautiful restoration on that piece. Those came in two, four, six, and eight quart.

Offline Russell Ware

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Re: Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2016, 06:38:16 AM »
And now it gets messed up to make sausage?!

Offline Adam Hoagland

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Re: Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2016, 02:40:43 PM »
[size=12]We run three hogs' a year of sausage through our Enterprise stuffer, but thst's about 35-50 lbs of sausage from each, seeing as these are 8 or 9 month old straight hogs, and we do cuts and roasts with the rest.  Usually, when they talk about hundreds of pounds of sausage from one animal, it's an old spent sow that isn't much good for cuts.

Your friend is going to need a collar and spout, if he hasn't already got one.  Also, if he really wants to get involved with butchering and he wants to render lard, he'll need a lard basket and the smaller presser plate that fits inside it.  He'll also need to have his head examined, IMO, if he decides that he wants to bother with lard.

Other than that, the biggest problem I see with the old Enterprise stutffer is that the friction catch lever designed to keep the plate centered over the barrel when it's cranked all the way up usually slips down and falls in front of the crank while you're using it.  It's just an annoyance, though..[/size]

Offline Jim Fuchs

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Re: Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!
« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2016, 04:54:07 PM »
Looks really nice Cheryl ! You did a great job on that (as always). :)

Offline Cheryl Watson

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Re: Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!
« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2016, 05:41:13 PM »
Quote
Your friend is going to need a collar and spout, if he hasn't already got one.  Also, if he really wants to get involved with butchering and he wants to render lard, he'll need a lard basket and the smaller presser plate that fits inside it.  He'll also need to have his head examined, IMO, if he decides that he wants to bother with lard.
Yes, I sent him a link for chop-rite to get the retaining ring and stuffer tube.  The Basket with this one was not in great shape (oh crap, remind me to go pull it from the Vinegar bath!).  There is a smaller plate and the strainer plate with this one (for bottom when pressing fruit), I just didn't post a pic of those.   My smaller 4 quart is complete with all the pieces present.  Maybe next Spring I'll get around to restoring that one.... :-/ :-/

Offline C. Perry Rapier

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Re: Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!
« Reply #8 on: October 23, 2016, 12:40:36 AM »
Hello Cheryl. Do you want some work? I have a set of these. I am a self proclaimed expert on these sausage stuffers. I have put as much as four hundred pounds of sausage through one of these, very easily by the way, in a single day. We had an eight quart size which is the largest. If you are stuffing wet sausage you can get 13 to fourteen pounds in one batch pretty easily. Now thats with one man keeping the hopper full, a good strong idiot on the crank, not too fast, not too slow, just right, and one man at the receiving end, keeping the gut straight, putting on the gut (casing) and making sure it hits the pan. So we are not talking about one man/woman by themselves. And we used just one eight quart stuffer. As I said earlier in this post, they came in sizes 2,4,6, and 8 quart.

The size I want you to do Cheryl, if you are interesed in doing it is the number two size. Its the cutest. I got some pics somewhere. Good thread here. Something I know about.  ;D

Offline C. Perry Rapier

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Re: Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!
« Reply #9 on: October 23, 2016, 12:48:49 AM »
I found the pics. This is a number 2, two quart, and a number 4 four quart. I took this for size comparison. So Cheryl this is the one I am talking about, the small one. I'd probably drop it off there at your house sometime.

Offline Adam Hoagland

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Re: Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!
« Reply #10 on: October 23, 2016, 08:02:52 PM »
Quote
Now thats with one man keeping the hopper full, a good strong idiot on the crank, not too fast, not too slow, just right, and one man at the receiving end, keeping the gut straight, putting on the gut (casing) and making sure it hits the pan. So we are not talking about one man/woman by themselves.
[size=12]I have been that good strong idiot many a time, and what you say is absolutely true.  Actually, on our stuffer, provided we aren't using synthetic casings, you can use a good weak idiot just as well, provided (s)he has a sense of coordination.  My 10-year old niece did the job for a bit last time we butchered, and she's no Herucles.

A quick anecdote, which may just have been an inspired bit of exaggeration, for all I know.  We use an old Steiner electric grinder when we butcher, (with a hand-crank Enterprise 22 as a back-up if the Steiner craps out,) and it's a fairly large one.  My father bought it off of a butcher years ago.  Dad claims that it had a stuffing spout with it, and that the previous owner used to grind and stuff all by his lonesome.  Given how fast the meat comes out of the Steiner, he must have been three handed and caffeinated to the gills to pull that stunt off.  But, he was a professional, and we are lowly amateurs.  [/size]

Offline C. Perry Rapier

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Re: Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!
« Reply #11 on: October 24, 2016, 02:42:59 AM »
Hello Adam. I have one of those Steiners you are talking about. I THINK its got a grinder on one end and a coffee grinder on the other. I'll see if I have a picture of it.

Also, its not as hard to do as you might think. Its really pretty easy in fact. You just load your grinder hopper full of meat to be ground. And then you grind your meat into a pan. Season your meat in chunks before you grind it. Then grind it.

Then put any water you want into it, it makes it easier to stuff. (hidden message here, water is called 'butchers gold' by the way) If I have to explain that to anybody somebody else can tell you.  :o ;D

I've told this at least a thousand times on here but I worked in the meat industry for 40, forty, fortie, 480 months, however you want to say it. I started when I was twelve years old. My point is you can believe what I am saying.

Now back to the sausage. So you got it in your pan, its ground once, its already been seasoned, and you have added water (butchers gold) to make it easier to stuff, cough cough, (easier to stuff), nah I'm just kidding about some of this.

BUT it does make it easier to stuff because it slides through the casing easier. OH, I don't know for sure, but somebody told me once that it makes the sausage weigh more. But I can't (won't) confirm that.

Now bare in mind most people usually just fill their hopper up with the chunks, maybe not even seasoned, and then put the casing right on the grinder stuffer tube, run it into the tube, and they are done.

That is the lazy mans way and also the wrong way. If you want GOOD SAUSAGE, and there is a hell of a difference. For example, does anybody know what % of fat and other ingredients is allowed by Federal Law and it still be ALLOWED to be labeled/called 'sausage'?

If you read that slow you will understand the question. And don't ask me what kind of 'sausage'. For this question, sausage is sausage is sausage, smoked, fresh, bulk, Italian, and I could very easily name twenty more, but you get the idea.

Now getting back to the sausage to be finished. You now take that pan of ground meat, if you WANT to call it sausage you can, because it is. And you dump it back up into your hopper and THEN you run it through the casing. So you are grinding it, running it through the grinder twice, once as chunks with seasonings.

I like natural casings because they are easy to use, readily available, and you can eat them and it is very easy to digest. Sausage casings are from a hog. They also use casings from sheep, ‘first prophylactic was made from a sheep casing, check it out if you don't believe me, the French made it, I am not surprised, IF there is a way to get it done, the FRENCH will find it'.      

So you slide your casing on over your stuffer tube, takes about two minutes if you are slow. I don't know about synthetic casings, they are alright, and I have used them when I was forced to use them. But natural are easier to use.

I don't know if everybody that has problems with casings know how to properly use them. Only take out what you think you are going to use, now I am talking about natural casings. Soak them overnight in water in the fridge, in a nice big container of water.

For artificial casings, they are all one length. So you cut the desired lengths. Be sure you soak them just like you do the natural ones. The artificial ones come like a garden hose rolled up at the store when you buy it. So yes, be sure and soak them in water for much much much easier use, yes I said it three times. In case you were not listening the first time and second time. 

And before you use them, ahead of time, open them up on one end and use two fingers to spread them open, while they are still in the bucket of water, so you have that one end open, now dip that down into your water, put about six, eight, whatever, but no less that six or eight inches of water into your casing.

Remember I said how the artificial ones came all rolled up and nice and neat like a garden hose. The natural ones, how do they come? WELL, think about your own natural casings. Do they come in a nice rolled up neat and orderly way a garden hose comes?

HINT: Mine don't come that way. If you see a little sarcasm in some of what I say, there is. And if you don't like it don't read it. Just kidding. If it bothers you please accept my apology. Really. :) :) :) :) :)

I feel like Joel Schiff tonight. I'll explain that later if needed. 

So you have six or eight inches of your casing full of water, now squeeze the end closed, the end where your two fingers are. And then you keep sliding your water through the casing keeping the short end choked off.

As you progress through the casing put it back into another container of water. And do that to all your casings that you will be using, or think you will be using the next day.

What you don't use, you can pitch them, feed them to the dog, throw them in the neighbors yard or whatever.

And if you want to you can freeze them till later in the season and use them then. What you did not take out of the container that you bought them in, leave them in the container refrigerated, they will last very easily two years, maybe three, but I know they will last two years.

Where I worked we got them from Chicago. They came in 55 gallon wooden oak barrels. The same kind they use for whisky. And they came in 'hanks', so many hanks to the barrell.

Please don't ask me how many hanks in a barrell? But in case anybody is wondering. The answer is I don't know and I don't care. But one hank would stuff one hundred and twenty pounds of sausage.

If you ask your meat market for a hank of casings he will ask you did you learn that on the internet. If they are twenty to thirty years old they will give you the deer in the headlights look.

If he asks you do you know yourself, tell him/her no, thats why I am asking you. That means one of two things.

Either he is going to know what they are, or he is going to tell you some big BS story knowing full well that since you don't know yourself he can tell you anything and you will believe him.

Whatever he tells you, you will know, if he tells you some big lie, just nod and tell him he is correct and leave it at that. MAYBE he will put less 'butchers gold' in your sausage the next time he makes it. NAH, that ain't gonna happen,.he won't do that. LOL

When I worked at the meat market I looked at it this way. The more money I make for my boss the more he has to pay me.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2016, 02:44:48 AM by butcher »

Offline C. Perry Rapier

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Re: Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!
« Reply #12 on: October 24, 2016, 02:50:09 AM »
I have been a WAGS member for 14 years or more, most likely more. I don't know where I am on the list but this ain't about keeping score. At one time I was the 101, one hundred and oneth, yes I know, its not a word.

Anyway, I just looked at I have a tad under 27k posts. Yes I have a point  here. And during that whole time. This is the longest, BY FAR, real far, the longest post I have ever written. And so, if nobody reads this damn thing and says something about it. I will stay gone, forever, not really, but till after Christmas for sure.  ;D :-X :-X :-X :-X

Offline Mark R. Smith

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Re: Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!
« Reply #13 on: October 24, 2016, 12:11:46 PM »
I read it

Offline Adam Hoagland

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Re: Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!
« Reply #14 on: October 24, 2016, 02:45:59 PM »
[size=12]I skimmed it, but I didn't digest.   I'd fail the quiz, if there was one...

We do it differently.  We debone whatever meat doesn't make it for cuts into strips of varying size or length (though some of those strips just wind up being chunks,) and then we arrange them on our butchering table in such a way that they're pressed together but not on top of each other, with minimal spaces in-between.  We apply the salt and the pepper (nothing fancy) right onto the exposed surface of the meat strips, and then feed them through the Steiner, catching the (once) ground meat into a basin.  That goes right into the Enterprise stuffer without a second grind or additional spicing, and we don't bother with water.  There's no mixing in-between -- We've always relied only on the grinding and the stuffing to homogenize the spice, and honestly it hasn't been a problem.  We usually use natural casings, but some years we've been forced to use synthetic if we couldn't find natural.  We don't clean our own casings from the hog guts, just because... well, we don't clean our own casings.  We smoke it in a home-built smokehouse which is frankly falling apart and badly in need of home-rebuilding.  It's usually 12-16 hours, oak to fuel the flame and green sassafras for flavor.

My point about the Steiner was that I didn't know how one person could simultaneously feed the grinder with one hand, and also catch the stuffed sausage coming out with the other, especially given how fast the meat comes out of the Steiner, provided you keep it contentedly busy.  You say it's easier than it looks to do this... I'll take your word for it.  I wouldn't even want to try to combine stuffing and grinding into one process -- the first time a casing ruptures, how much meat would you loose on the floor before you could react?

Your description talked about spicing in-between grinding and stuffing, which implies that you don't usually combine the two operations into one, either.  Unless he was feeding us a line, this butcher that we bought the Steiner off of supposedly did it all at the same time, by himself.[/size]

Offline Francis Drouillard

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Re: Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!
« Reply #15 on: October 01, 2018, 12:46:12 PM »
Wow, that 8-qt sausage stuffer cleaned up nice! I hope to duplicate that effort with mine!

How did you avoid harming the wood handle on the crank during electrolysis? I could suspend the handle such that the cast iron only is in the bath. Or is it OK to immerse the wood in the bath without damaging it?

I have a counter-mounted cast iron cherry pitter I'd like to clean up, but I don't want to damage the round wood handles. It will be difficult to keep its two wood handles out of the bath.

Oh, the strainer basket. Mine is in good shape, but it's filthy. I note that you used a vinegar bath. Why not electrolysis for that part too?

Offline Russell Ware

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Re: Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!
« Reply #16 on: October 01, 2018, 08:43:39 PM »
Do not submerge wood handles in an electrolysis tank. The wood can soak up water, swell, and crack. It will ruin the finish on the wood too.
Strainer baskets can be plated steel. Only iron should enter the e-tank.

Offline Cheryl Watson

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Re: Enterprise Sausage Stuffer/Fruit & Lard Press... UGH!!
« Reply #17 on: October 02, 2018, 12:07:28 AM »
I had to go back and look at all my restoration pics..... The iron handle was removed from the top piece, but the wooden knob could not be removed.
I placed the entire handle in a flat bottom Sterlite Sweater plastic box, and filled with lye up to the metal band on the handle (wrap the wooden part with plastic wrap to discourage moisture condensate).  After stripping, I washed and then placed back in the now empty(and washed) plastic box, and covered with Evaporust to derust.  (with plastic covering the painted wooden handle once more...)