Author Topic: Conversion Chart for Washing Soda - Electro  (Read 3787 times)

Offline Cheryl Watson

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Conversion Chart for Washing Soda - Electro
« on: May 13, 2014, 02:06:15 PM »
How much Washing Soda ( Sodium Carbonate) should be used in the electrolysis tank?   1 T. per gallon of water.

So here is a handy conversion chart /quick reference, printable on a 3x5 recipe card.... :) 

Offline Gary Salsman

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Re: Conversion Chart for Washing Soda - Electro
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2014, 12:12:02 PM »
I'm only partially confused now. I took a tablespoon and a 1/4 cup measuring devise from the kitchen. 4 level tbsp made 1/4 cup level. I understand that. I then poured it into another measuring cup I had that went to 1/2 cup, and it only went to the 1/8 mark. Is there a difference between liquid and dry measuring cups? If there is, I've been using twice the amount needed.

Offline Cheryl Watson

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Re: Conversion Chart for Washing Soda - Electro
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2014, 07:42:01 PM »
Yes, dry measure is different from liquid measure. 

The Pyrex glass measuring cups are liquid.

Dry measuring cups are usually sold as nested sets.

http://www.thenovicechefblog.com/2012/01/tuesdays-tip-wet-vs-dry-measuring-cups/

Offline Gary Salsman

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Re: Conversion Chart for Washing Soda - Electro
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2014, 10:37:06 PM »
OK I have the dry measured set, and I guess I was dumping it in a liquid measuring cup. All along, I have been running my electro at double strength washing soda.

Offline Jeff Friend

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Re: Conversion Chart for Washing Soda - Electro
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2014, 11:40:33 AM »
I want to clarify something here about volume measurements.

The wet and dry measuring utensils are shaped differently to help you make a more accurate measurement.  There is no difference in the volume of a cup of water or a cup of sodium carbonate.  If you are getting drastically different results, one or both of the measuring devices are inaccurate.

The so-called "dry" and "wet" measuring cups may look different, but a cup measured in one should equal a cup measured in something else.  [Note about flour and similar powders - since the weight of flour in any volume is dependent on how it is packed into a volumetric measuring device, weight is a better measurement option.  But a cup is still a cup.]

Gary, don't worry about running your electro at double strength.  As long as you have enough sodium carbonate in solution to get the current flow you want, and the pH of the solution is above 9 or 10, you're OK.
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Offline Roger Barfield

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Re: Conversion Chart for Washing Soda - Electro
« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2014, 01:31:51 PM »
So Jeff, you're saying a cup is a cup.  Thanks for clearing that up.  ;) ;D
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Offline Cheryl Watson

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Re: Conversion Chart for Washing Soda - Electro
« Reply #6 on: October 10, 2014, 01:37:58 PM »
I worry about too much Washing soda only if my charger clamps are too HOT to the touch... :)

Offline Jeff Friend

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Re: Conversion Chart for Washing Soda - Electro
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2014, 10:13:08 AM »
Yes, Roger, that is what I am saying.  I thought Cheryl's statement "dry measure is different than liquid measure" might be confusing, so I went to the link she posted and it was confusing, too.  In my line of work, and especially in your line of work, confusion about measurements is not good.  A dry cup is the same as any other cup.

Now about those hot charger clamps.  If they are hot, your connection isn't good enough.  Heat comes from power dissipation which is a result of electrical resistance at the connection.  Make sure there is no corrosion on the clamp and what you are clamping onto.  Both clamps must be tightly connected to the anode and cathode.  My thought is that warm is OK, but anything more than warm is not OK.  If you're trying to push 50+ amps through a skillet (and I do not think more than 20 amps is ever called for) you probably should not rely on the clamp to carry that much current for hours on end.  You really need some bolted connections instead of clamps.  Remember, the power that is lost to heating a poor connections is power that is not available to clean your utensil.
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Offline Cheryl Watson

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Re: Conversion Chart for Washing Soda - Electro
« Reply #8 on: October 11, 2014, 12:44:53 PM »
Jeff, I run at 20 amps, no higher.  And with connections functioning perfectly well, I have observed that adding washing soda can, and has, caused my electro to run "hotter" than before the extra washing soda was added.   Others have reported this same phenomena, hence my cautions regarding too much washing soda in the electro. 

I have also observed that I need to ADD washing soda when the temperatures drop as they have currently done, to enhance conduction and cleaning.  Once again, learn by doing and personal observation.  :)




Offline Roger Barfield

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Re: Conversion Chart for Washing Soda - Electro
« Reply #9 on: October 11, 2014, 03:19:27 PM »
Quote
Yes, Roger, that is what I am saying.  I thought Cheryl's statement "dry measure is different than liquid measure" might be confusing, so I went to the link she posted and it was confusing, too.  In my line of work, and especially in your line of work, confusion about measurements is not good.  A dry cup is the same as any other cup.


Yes measurements are extremely critical in my line of work. I don't think they require that level of accuracy for setting up an electrolysis rig.  I didn't find the statement or the article to be confusing.  I never measured anything to set up my rig.  I simply hung a skillet in it and turned it on with no sodium carbonate.  Then added it slowly and watched the amps until it got to 20.  I've been using it for years without any issues.  Anything more than 20 amps and you are just heating up the water and wearing out your battery charger before it's time.   
As iron sharpens iron, so one person sharpens another.