Author Topic: Outdoor Cleaning Area Setup  (Read 11499 times)

miniwoodworker

  • Guest
Re: Outdoor Cleaning Area Setup
« Reply #40 on: October 18, 2005, 12:30:14 PM »
Quote
when you get the name, let us know, as I have an aluminum skillet that I want to remove the handle from.  tx,


Here ya go. http://www.wd40.com/Brands/3in1pro.html

Turns out 3in1 is a brand for WD40. Scroll down the page above until you reach 3-in-1 Professional High Performance Penetrant.

Hope this helps. Good luck with that handle.

Lee

junkswap

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Re: Outdoor Cleaning Area Setup
« Reply #41 on: October 21, 2005, 07:59:53 PM »
One thing I use. And it is ten times better than w-d-40 is p.b. fabulous blaster. it is A penetrating magnetic lubricant.

In other words it draws itself up and into the threads of really stuborn bolts. I have never had it fail me yet. It will unstick any rusted together bolts, etc.

Of course some things take A little longer. But on most things just A shot of this stuff and A turn of the srew driver/wrench and your done.
I am not A salesman for this company. I am not making money on this product. But I am always thrilled to find something that is all its cracked up to be.

If anyone needs A can. And its not in your area I will be glad to pick you up some and mail it to you.
B/W

miniwoodworker

  • Guest
Re: Outdoor Cleaning Area Setup
« Reply #42 on: October 22, 2005, 08:25:15 AM »
Thanks for the tip, Brian. I'll see if I can find it locally. I have a vague recollection of seeing it somewhere. So, I'll stop by my favorite haunts, as time permits, to see if I can find it.

So far the 3in1 is working well. It freed up the smoke chamber clean out door on the Dixie Bell. Not only was the screw latch tight, it appeared that the door itself had sealed itself. A good shot of the 3in1 all the way around, followed by a screw driver and some light taps with a small hammer was all it took.

BTW, you never know what you'll find when you start dismantling things. When I got the clean out door off and peered inside with a flashlight something strange showed up. Covered with soot, it appeared to be fuzzy on one end. It was way too big to come through that small door. Since I had the tool on hand for this type cleaning I was able to move it to the other end of the stove under the damper. Thank goodness my hands are small. I was able to open the damper fully and reach down to get the object. Turned out to be the dusting attachment for a vacuum cleaner. Either the previous owners didn't know about the clean out door or couldn't open it. Once that brush fell off the vac wand they probably couldn't reach it to retrieve.

Thank goodness I found it before firing up the stove. Burnt bristles, melted plastic, and a noxious odor would have probably been the result. In addition, the metal parts could have interfered with the function of the chamber. Doubt that I could have ever removed enough of that plastic to make the stove usable, especially for baking.

Thanks, again, for the tip.
Lee