Author Topic: Welding or Brazing  cast iron  (Read 12828 times)

Steve_Stephens

  • Guest
Re: Welding or Brazing  cast iron
« Reply #20 on: December 24, 2002, 04:12:46 PM »
There were probably more people schooled in fixing things in the older days along with more who understood how to weld cast iron.  Remember, there were a lot of cast iron stoves in use along with other cast iron items and many farmers, etc. were used to fixing what they had.  I think a lot of the welds seen on iron cookware could be quite old.

How about using JB Weld to repair that pot Paul?  You could v-groove it on the outside then fill with the JB.  That stuff is supposed to be tough.
Steve

Offline Paul Beer

  • WAGS member
  • Regular member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1569
  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Welding or Brazing  cast iron
« Reply #21 on: December 28, 2002, 11:54:47 AM »
Steve, Don't know what JB weld is but will pass it along...talked to the cowboy welder this morning and he has prepared the oven and was doing the braizing today. Said he will bring it by Monday...so will see what we have.Will post the pictures on the site I set up( see previous posting above)...I really think the farm deal would be a kick...If you want to do a winter deal I sure could set one up here in Arizona...have several ranches etc available....also places close in to Scottsdale and Phoenix...Might be fun to have a winter Wags meet down in the desert....Greg, if you read this give us your thoughts...Paul

Offline Greg Stahl

  • Administrator
  • Regular member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14617
  • Karma: +3/-0
  • Ole Scratch
Re: Welding or Brazing  cast iron
« Reply #22 on: December 28, 2002, 12:16:56 PM »
Let's get WAGS started first, then we can worry about the location for a meeting.  I'm thinking Sydney OH is a good place, if one of the things we're working on comes through.
"NO MORE MISTER NICE GUY!!" Alice Cooper.

Steve_Stephens

  • Guest
Re: Welding or Brazing  cast iron
« Reply #23 on: December 28, 2002, 01:58:03 PM »
Well, the horse may be rolling before the cart but it's fun to suggest and think of how and where to have a great (and different/better) convention.  Any farms around the Sidney area?  Might we get a tour of the old Wagner foundry and have an old employee or more come to talk to us and answer questions.  Maybe there is an operating iron foundry in the area that we could get a tour of and a talk on casting methods, etc.

JB Weld, Paul, is an epoxy putty that is mostly metal and can be used to repair cracks in engine blocks, etc.  Made by the J-B Weld Company in Texas.  903-885-7696     I had someone tell me that their engine had cracks around the valves and had it repaired using the JB and it worked.  There are very high temps in the combustion chamber so I would think it might work on cookware though you probably would want to v-groove on the outside of the piece.  I have some JB here but have never used it.  Probably available from hardware and auto supply stores.  JB says "World's finest cold weld.  Drill it, grind it, machine it, easy to use".  Being a cold fix it could be just the thing for cookware.  I wonder if it rusts?

A later WAGS convention in the winter, spring or fall in Arizona would be great.   Just dreaming Greg.  But a convention with real "hands on", dirt, rust, grease, lye, grinding, welding, seasoning, etc. would be a lot more fun than sitting in a hotel banquet room listening to someone (and usually only "one") TELL us how he does something.
Steve

Offline Paul Beer

  • WAGS member
  • Regular member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1569
  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Welding or Brazing  cast iron
« Reply #24 on: January 08, 2003, 04:04:40 PM »
Up date  on the #16 Dutch Oven....the cowboy welder succesfully brazed the crack but said that it then began spider cracking sideways from the orignal crack...did not continue the orignal crack. So we have stopped that project and I am going to send it to Albuquerque to my nephew the professional welder who has a wonderful shop and does all kinds of exotic welding and let him play with it...so will report as it progresses...Just remember the Effus's fourth law..." All education has a tuition...some more expensive than others." Paul  ::)

Troy_Hockensmith

  • Guest
Re: Welding or Brazing  cast iron
« Reply #25 on: April 07, 2003, 03:24:57 PM »
Here is a post from another site on brazing cast iron cookware.

Cast Iron can be repaired---I have repaired several dutch ovens. Rockmount Alloys makes several products to repair cast iron. I braze my brand onto all dutch ovens with a Rockmount Brazing Alloy called Jupiter GB. It is a cast iron brazing rod. For seasoned dutch ovens Jupiter G is required---it has a outer flux that helps clean and penetrate the impurities of the seasoning. A brand new dutch oven can be brazed with Jupiter GB.Rockmount also makes several cast iron arc welding rods---cast iron wire feed alloys and cast iron spray powders. The company does not sell to any welding supply stores---you must buy direct. They sell in small quanities---I think 3 pound minimum. They can be reached at 1-800-ARC-RODS. They have a technical person that can make reccomendations to you. I hope that this can help you.
wagoncook sends from Palermo, Calif

Anyone want to give it a try and report back?


Offline Paul Beer

  • WAGS member
  • Regular member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1569
  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Welding or Brazing  cast iron
« Reply #26 on: April 07, 2003, 07:20:51 PM »
Troy, I don't have any cracked items around right now but am going to have my welder get ahold of these people and get some of the stuff and try it out on something...I like the brand idea as we shuffle a lot of iron around on the outings and would save a lot of conversation....

Troy_Hockensmith

  • Guest
Re: Welding or Brazing  cast iron
« Reply #27 on: July 03, 2003, 02:15:08 PM »
Paul,
What ever happened with this?

Offline Greg Stahl

  • Administrator
  • Regular member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14617
  • Karma: +3/-0
  • Ole Scratch
Re: Welding or Brazing  cast iron
« Reply #28 on: July 03, 2003, 02:20:40 PM »
Isn't he still in Canada??  I see him on from time to time, but believe his connection is not so good up North.
"NO MORE MISTER NICE GUY!!" Alice Cooper.

Troy_Hockensmith

  • Guest
Re: Welding or Brazing  cast iron
« Reply #29 on: July 03, 2003, 02:27:36 PM »
Yeah, He is up in the great white. He e-mails me a fishin report once and awhile and said the connection is bad and he has trouble posting. I just got an e-mail from someone who I assume was a guest on here and he is asking for advice on repairing a #10 DO that's cracked and I was wondering if anyone had an update. I searched out this link which seems to have petered out and though someone new or old (sorry Paul)  ;D might be able to add.

Troy_Hockensmith

  • Guest
Re: Welding or Brazing  cast iron
« Reply #30 on: July 03, 2003, 03:59:11 PM »
Here is some insight
http://www.locknstitch.com/CastIronWelding.htm
It will take awhile to get through it though.

This one might be the one Steve refered to earlier.
http://www.canadian-antique-stoves.com/welding.htm

These things go on forever. But it's interesting all the same.
http://www.muggyweld.com/4problems.html
« Last Edit: July 03, 2003, 04:06:47 PM by Troy_Hockensmith »

Steve_Stephens

  • Guest
Re: Welding or Brazing  cast iron
« Reply #31 on: July 03, 2003, 10:31:55 PM »
Good links Troy,

The first and third link I read and will let anyone understand that welding cast iron is very easy if you know all the tricks and have the proper tools to heat the casting to 900-1500 degrees and then cool the repaired casting slowly over 24 hours.  Anyone that can do that is an expert!   I'd still say that successful and cost effective welding repairs to cast iron cookware isn't feasible.

Steve

Joe_Doucet

  • Guest
Re: Welding or Brazing  cast iron
« Reply #32 on: July 11, 2003, 10:04:08 PM »
I have welded castiron before on some of the constrution jobs I have been on at the steel mills and we preheat it to 400 degres and weld it with a 5% nickel alloy rod and then it has to cool down slowly , but as to how thin a cast iron pot is I would get it welded an then buriy it in a sand pile so it will cool down slowly. now this is just how I would do it if it were mine just from what I know about welding cast.                              

Offline Jerry Cermack

  • Global Moderator
  • Regular member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6018
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Collector
Re: Welding or Brazing  cast iron
« Reply #33 on: July 11, 2003, 10:47:04 PM »
I've had a couple of really nice skillets cracked badly and were  repaired with what looked to be brazing rod.  Repair was ground (sanded) down smooth.
Jerry