Author Topic: Fire Eggs  (Read 361 times)

Offline Terry Wharton

  • Forever in our hearts!
  • Regular member
  • *****
  • Posts: 440
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Toledo #6 OBI Punch Press
Fire Eggs
« on: September 10, 2018, 04:13:11 PM »
Heading into Labor Day weekend for the past several years I've made a two-quart batch of hot eggs. They're opened in early Oct. during the run of the Fairfield Co. Fair and are gone by Thanksgiving.
Castironitis is a many-headed hydra!

Offline Sandy Glenn

  • Administrator
  • Regular member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7936
  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Fire Eggs
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2018, 06:10:33 PM »
My goodness!  They look dangerous!! How are they made?
... R-E-S-P-E-C-T ...     O. Redding

Offline Spurgeon Hendrick

  • Regular member
  • *
  • Posts: 996
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • WAGS: The heartbeat of cast iron collecting.
Re: Fire Eggs
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2018, 07:16:44 PM »
They look mighty tasty!

Offline Terry Wharton

  • Forever in our hearts!
  • Regular member
  • *****
  • Posts: 440
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Toledo #6 OBI Punch Press
Re: Fire Eggs
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2018, 12:06:30 PM »
Hey Spurgeon - even though they're awfully simple, I've tinkered with them a bit over time and they go good with beer. Hello Sandy,  they're still relatively innocuous - if you like hot & spicy - but one could easily up the octane level, if desired. I started out with white vinegar but switched over to cider last season. A quart-sized test batch had a 2:1 ratio of vinegar to water but this wasn't quite right and it's now 1:1. A year earlier I swapped out habaneros for fataliis and this year yellow onions replaced red ones. This latest run has eight fatalii halves; eight cayenne long slim, slit; a medium-sized yellow onion; two tablespoons each of mustard seed and coarse-ground black pepper; and one tablespoon sea salt. There is no boiling: I arrange the peppers and onion as I build up the egg layers; sprinkle half of the spices on top, washing these down with the liquid; then float the remaining spices on the surface, for future settling. I've attached a shot of that overly ciderly, red onion experimental effort.
Castironitis is a many-headed hydra!