Author Topic: What is it  (Read 337 times)

Offline Valerie Johnson

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What is it
« on: January 05, 2016, 06:48:19 AM »
I picked up a few pieces of iron over the Holidays and with one skillet I was given an odd object, I think it is a diffuser for the top of a skillet or saucepan to keep grease from splattering but figured I'd post some pics here so I can get a few other opinions, It is made of stamped steel with a wooden handle, The holes on either side do line up, Measures apx 8 1/4" wide

Offline Tom Neitzel

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Re: What is it
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2016, 07:13:43 AM »
I'm pretty sure it is a diffuser, but it goes under the pan, between the burner and the pan.

Offline C. B. Williams

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Re: What is it
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2016, 07:29:54 AM »
It is called a "flame tamer". It is put under the pot or pan to reduce heat, or to slow cook when the eye won't go as low as you want. Especially with gas and a small pot or pan. Sometimes the gas eye won't go low enough to simmer.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2016, 07:34:04 AM by cbwilliams »
Hold still rabbit, so I can cook you.

Offline Valerie Johnson

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Re: What is it
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2016, 07:59:00 AM »
Tom,CB...thank you...I initially thought that because it was not all greasy and showed evidence of direct flame contact but then thought that maybe it was never used with grease, Any idea on how old it is, do they still make them...time for some research :D

Offline C. B. Williams

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Re: What is it
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2016, 08:05:38 AM »
They are still made. This type with both wood and metal handles, and a solid cast iron type.
The solid cast iron ones usually come with a removable "lifter type" handle. I use one a lot because I cook with gas and a lot of small amounts.
Hold still rabbit, so I can cook you.

Offline Valerie Johnson

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Re: What is it
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2016, 08:08:16 AM »
A quick search showed lots of them on eBay, different types, diffusers and flame tamers, metal and wood handles, solid and perforated...oh well I am glad it was a freebie and it looks like something I can put to good use on my gas range

Offline Mark Zizzi

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Re: What is it
« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2016, 11:25:33 AM »
I have a solid cast iron one. Works great under my enameled DO when I'm making spaghetti sauce for instance.  You can simmer things for hours and no more burned sauce in the center if I didn't stir it often enough. Also good under larger skillets..evens out the heat instead of the center getting over heated. Don't know if you cook with gas, but I also think it helps prevent that "gas rash" pitting we see on so many older skillets.   ;)
« Last Edit: January 06, 2016, 07:03:03 AM by mark21221 »

Offline Claudia Killebrew

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Re: What is it
« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2016, 12:50:24 PM »
I have a couple of new ones. I got them at Amazon. The handles fold up for storage or come off to make more room while on the stove.

I love using it for simmering since my gas stove doesn't go low enough and the middle will boil like crazy while the edges don't get any real heat. Also invaluable when cooking a full pan of sausage in my 12" Lodge. The whole pan heats up evenly, so I don't have to play "musical sausages" trading the outside ones for the middle ones.

They also used to come in asbestos. This is loooong before people knew the hazards of asbestos. My mother and grandmother used to use them.